Lenoir Quick Facts

City of Lenoir Quick Facts 2017

Creative energy thrives in Lenoir. From the entrepreneurs who made Lenoir the furniture manufacturing center of the South, to the employees of the biotech and cyberspace industries, Lenoir has always been a place where people forge partnerships to build a better future.

Our rich heritage of music and craft earn national recognition for Lenoir, and the City is expanding Greenway trails to connect residents and visitors to greater opportunities for physical fitness while enjoying the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the wild and scenic rivers that make our landscape beautiful and unique.

 

US CENSUS DATA

  • Population estimates, July 1, 2016 17,973
  • Population per square mile 928.1
  • Households, 2012-2016 7,251
  • Median household income $31,064
  • Persons per household, 2012-2016 2.40
  • High school graduate or higher, age 25 years 78.6%
  • Bachelor’s degree or higher, age 25 years 14.9%
  • Housing units, April 1, 2010 8,568
  • Owner-occupied housing unit rate 7.3%
  • Median value of housing (2012-2016) $105,400

 

LENOIR CITY COUNCIL

The City of Lenoir City Council consists of 8 members, the mayor and 7 council members.

  • Name, served since
  • Joe Gibbons, Mayor, 2005
  • Ben Willis, Mayor Pro Tem, 2011
  • Jonathan Beal, 2017
  • Todd Perdue, 2003
  • Ike Perkins, 2013
  • T.J. Rohr, 2003
  • David Stevens, 2003
  • Crissy Thomas, 2013

 

Administration, Scott Hildebran, City Manager

5.5 employees • City Manager, City Clerk, Human Resources Specialist, Public Information Officer

  • Manages day-to-day operations of the City
  • Oversees the City’s ~25 million budget
  • Handles scheduling for City Council, creates Council agendas, records Council minutes
  • Processes an average of 45 employment applications a month; maintains personnel records and benefits plans for 254 full-time and 88 part-time employees; distributed 385 W-2s in 2016
  • Manages external and internal communications in the city via the City website, social media accounts, news releases, newsletters, and videos, and monitors public engagement with the City

 

Downtown Economic Development • Kaylynn Horn, Director

2 employees

  • Administers the City of Lenoir Main Street Program, downtown revitalization, retail and small commercial development programs, grants, and incentives
  • Organizes local events, promotes downtown businesses
  • www.downtownlenoir.com

 

Finance • Donna Bean, Director

11 employees (10 full-time, 1 part-time) 

  • Collects water/sewer bills and tax bills for 10,000 customers
  • Collects payments for Duke Energy
  • Responsible for payroll, billing, and collection functions
  • Provides IT services for the City 

 

Fire • Ken Briscoe, Chief 

62 employees (57 full-time, 5 part-time)

  • Maintains a Class 3 ISO Rating
  • Provides fire suppression services
  • Administers fire code enforcement
  • Provides fire education
  • Operates two fire stations in the city limits

2016 Statistics

  • 36 Structure Fires
  • 18 Vehicle Fires
  • 27 Grass-woods Fires
  • 40 Other Fires
  • 1,436 Medical Calls
  • 127 Vehicle Accidents with Injuries
  • 140 Vehicle Accidents with no Injuries
  • 1,168 Other Calls
  • 2,989 Total Calls for Assistance in 2016

 

Parks and Recreation • Kenny Story, Director

84 employees (20 full time and 64 part time/seasonal)

Parks & Grounds

Responsible for maintaining ~84 acres and landscape including annual shrubs and trees at the following:

  • Community Gardens - Unity Park and Beall Street
  • J.E. Broyhill Park
  • Lenoir Greenway system
  • Lenoir High School Auditorium
  • Lenoir High School Gym
  • Lenoir Optimist Park
    • 2 baseball / softball fields
    • Club House
    • Maintenance Building
  • Lenoir Rotary Soccer Complex
  • Mack Cook Stadium
  • T. Henry Wilson Athletic Park
  • T.H. Broyhill Walking Park
  • West End Community Park
    • Outdoor Basketball Court
    • 1 picnic shelter

Recreation Facilities

Mulberry Recreation Center

  • 4 tennis courts
  • 2 softball fields
  • 3 youth baseball fields
  • 3 picnic shelters
  • 2 batting cages
  • Indoor / outdoor basketball courts
  • Playground area
  • Skateboard park
  • Multi-purpose room
  • Kitchen
  • Game room

Aquatic & Fitness Center

  • Outdoor Olympic-size pool
  • Indoor Junior Olympic-size pool
  • 4 waterslides (indoor and outdoor)
  • 2 racquetball courts
  • 2 covered shelters
  • Exercise equipment
  • Fitness Classroom
  • Whirlpool & steam room
  • Weight room
  • Men’s and Women’s locker rooms
  • Walking / mountain bike trails

Martin Luther King, Jr. Center

  • Indoor / outdoor basketball courts
  • 2 tennis courts
  • 1 picnic shelter
  • 4 shuffleboard courts
  • 1 baseball / softball field
  • Social hall
  • Weight room
  • Multi-purpose room
  • Game room
  • Kitchen
  • Computer lab

Classes & Fitness

  • Aerobics
  • Gymnastics
  • Martial Arts
  • Yoga
  • Zumba

Sports Programs

  • Baseball (Youth)
  • Basketball (Youth)
  • Basketball Camp
  • LYSA Soccer
  • Summer Basketball League
  • Softball (Youth)
  • Tennis Clinics (Youth)

Events

  • Easter Egg Hunt Extravaganza
  • Friday After Five Concerts
  • Independence Day Celebration
  • Harambee Festival
  • Half Marathon
  • Festival in the Park
  • Christmas Parade
  • Blackberry Festival
  • 5K & 10K Runs

 

Planning • Jenny Wheelock, AICP, Director

5 employees

  • Engages residents in community planning projects to stabilize property values, eliminate vacant/substandard housing, and build neighborhood pride and a unique sense of place.
  • Administers land use and development codes
  • Implements comprehensive, long-range growth plans
  • Reviews development plans for new residential, commercial, and industrial development
  • Administers housing nuisance codes
  • Implements stormwater program for six municipalities in Caldwell County

 

Police • Scott Brown, Chief

83 employees (68 full time and 15 part time; 4 volunteer chaplains, 3 canines)

Patrol

  • Responds to all dispatched calls for police service
  • Specialized services also include Bike Patrol, K-9, Special Response Team, Honor Guard, Explorers Post, Auxiliary Reserve, Parking Enforcement, Mentoring, School Resource

Criminal Investigations

  • Investigates white collar crime, cyber crime, property crime, crimes against persons, sex crimes, and narcotics
  • Provides Evidence Control and Crime Scene Investigation
  • Provides Nuisance Abatement
  • Works with Patrol Officers to address criminal activity

Support Services

  • Provides Emergency 9-1-1 services for police, medical, fire, and rescue needs within the city 
  • Oversees Records Management, Logistics/Financial Responsibility, and training for the department
  • Administers the overall implementation and adherence of professional standards for all employees
  • Generate crime analysis, trend assessment, and mapping for members of the department and public

2016 Statistics

Communications Processed:

  • 44,539 CAD calls


Officers responded to:

  • 23,810 calls for service
  • 15,961 property checks
  • 949 call follow-ups
  • 1,159 traffic crashes
  • 533 students received DARE instruction
  • SROs were active in 6 elementary schools, 1 middle school, and 1 high school


Took In

  • 425 lbs of prescription drugs from lobby drop box
  • 39,750 dosage units from two off-site Rx drop events
  • $866,794 in property recovered by investigations
  • $193,764 was seized in illegal narcotics (Joint Effort)

 

Public Utilities • Radford Thomas, Director

49.5 employees (48.5 full-time, 1 part-time)

Administrative/Engineering

  • Approves design plans for new utility infrastructure
  • Prepares, submits and oversees $8 million dollar budget and enterprise fund
  • Tracks and documents work orders for state compliance
  • Coordinates departmental projects

Distribution/Collection

  • 219 miles of water lines and 209 miles of sewer lines
  • 1,100 fire hydrants
  • 11,000 service lines, meters, and meter boxes
  • Installs new services, both residential and commercial

Water Treatment

  • 9 State-certified employees
  • Operates 24 hours per day / 365 days per year
  • Storage Capacity-13.4 million gallons
  • Pumping ability-9,375 gallons per minute

Wastewater Treatment

  • Lower Creek WWTP treated 918,254,000 gallons in 2017; Gunpowder Creek WWTP treated 376,360,000 gallons in 2013 - total 1.3 BILLION gallons treated
  • 8 employees in plant operation; 3 employees in bio solids treatment; 3 employees in lab/pretreatment
  • 22 total certifications possessed
  • 8 Grade 4 operator certifications
  • 3 Grade 4 laboratory certifications
  • State certified laboratory performed more than 
  • 6,500 individual tests during 2017 on both plants, industries, and water plant

Utilities Maintenance

  • Maintains 16 water pump stations and sewer lift stations
  • Performs maintenance on pumps, chemical feeders, mixers, blowers, etc. at each of the three treatment facilities

 

Public Works • Charles Beck, Director

44 employees

Solid Waste

  • Provides residential curbside garbage pick up in the city
  • Operates a Recycling Convenience Center on Pennton Ave. 
  • Removes bagged yard waste and animal carcasses from streets and curbside
  • Operates leaf collection Oct. 15 through Jan. 15

Streets

  • Maintains 124.64 miles of paved and 2.69 miles of un-paved streets
  • Provides support for state-maintained streets
  • Construction management of newly-constructed streets and highways as well as the City’s Greenway system
  • Maintains City right-of-way, storm drainage system, sidewalks, snow removal, traffic signage, street and parking lot striping, event set-up
  • Removes residential brush

Engineering

  • Coordinates public works projects as they relate to street construction, building maintenance, cemetery, sanitation, and motor fleet functions

Building Maintenance

  • Responsible for all mechanical, electrical, 
  • plumbing, and general construction repairs and maintenance to the City’s 45 public buildings and all non-vehicular mechanical and electrical equipment
  • Maintains approximately 5 miles of rail system

Cemeteries / Downtown Grounds

  • Provides for maintenance and upkeep of two city cemeteries - Bellview and Blue Ridge - totaling about 30 acres
  • Manages sales of grave plots and markers
  • Provides maintenance for public spaces in downtown

Vehicle Services

  • Responsible for the maintenance of 520 motor vehicles, “off- road, non-highway use” vehicular equipment, and internal combustion equipment in the city fleet
  • Provides fuel for all City vehicles, as well as a number of county fire departments and rescue squads

 

City Facilities

Lenoir, NC 28645 unless noted otherwise

Blue Ridge Cemetery, 2017 Wilkesboro Blvd

City Hall, 801 West Ave NW, PO Box 958

City/County Chambers, 905 West Avenue NW

Fire Headquarters602 Harper Ave

Fire Station 2, 1927 Norwood St

Lenoir Aquatic Center, 1130 Jim Barger Court

Martin Luther King Jr. Center, 313 Greenhaven Drive NE

Mulberry Recreation Center, 720 Mulberry Street SW

Optimist Park, 701 Mulberry Street SW

Police Department, 1035 West Ave NW

Public Works / Public Utilities Headquarters, 510-B Greer Circle

Recycling Center, 1121 Pennton Avenue

Wastewater Treatment Plant (Gunpowder Creek), 450 Pine Mountain Road, Hudson NC 28638

Wastewater Treatment Plant (Lower Creek), 1905 Broadland Rd

Water Treatment Plant (George L. Bernhardt), 5474 Waterworks Rd, Granite Falls NC 28630

Vehicle Services510-C Greer Circle