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Date:
November 26, 2020 - November 27, 2020
Time:
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Location:
City Hall
Address:
801 West Ave NW
Lenoir, NC 28645
Thanksgiving At Plymouth painting by Jennie Brownscombe
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Thanksgiving Holiday Closings

Thursday, November 26, 2020

City Hall and recreational facilities will be closed Thursday, Nov. 26, and Friday, Nov. 27, to celebrate Thanksgiving.

Garbage Collection

City Sanitation will operate on a normal schedule Monday through Thursday. Staff will not collect garbage on Friday. Friday's route will be collected Wednesday.

The recycling center on Pennton Avenue will operate on a normal schedule.

Click here to view the Garbage Routes.

Click here to view the Leaf Collection Routes and Schedule.

About the Holiday

In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states.

During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress designated one or more days of thanksgiving a year, and in 1789 President George Washington issued the first Thanksgiving proclamation by the national government of the United States. In it, he called upon Americans to express their gratitude for the happy conclusion to the country’s war of independence and the successful ratification of the U.S. Constitution. His successors John Adams and James Madison also designated days of thanks during their presidencies.

In 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln signed a proclamation entreating all Americans to ask God to “commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife” and to “heal the wounds of the nation.” President Lincoln scheduled Thanksgiving for the final Thursday in November, and it was celebrated on that day every year until 1939, when Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week in an attempt to spur retail sales during the Great Depression. Roosevelt’s plan, known derisively as Franksgiving, was met with passionate opposition, and in 1941 the president reluctantly signed a bill making Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday in November.

Traditional Thanksgiving Traditions In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states. It wasn’t until 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November. Source